Prof. Dr. Christoph J. Brabec

Institute Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology (i-MEET) / Department of Materials Science

i-MEET is developing and discovering functional semiconducting and optical materials, as required for advanced semiconductor technologies. Activities covery all aspects of printed electronics, from energy harvesting to sensing to imaging and X-Ray devices. A state of the art printing lab allows to process such devices on various surfaces by analog as well as digital 2D, 3D and Additive Manufacturing printing techniques.

Research projects

  • Development of solution processed semiconductors for large area X-Ray detectors
  • Development of printed transparent & opqaue flexible electrode systems
  • Discovery of novel phoshor materials for sensing, marking and imaging
  • Operating automated rob

  • Spitzenlastfähige Hochtemperatur-Speicher

    (Third Party Funds Group – Sub project)

    Overall project: Energy Campus Nuremberg
    Term: 1. January 2017 - 31. December 2021
    Funding source: Bayerisches Staatsministerium für Bildung und Kultus, Wissenschaft und Kunst (ab 10/2013)
    URL: https://www.evt.tf.fau.de/forschung/forschungsschwerpunkte/2nd-generation-fuels/energie-campus-nuernberg-teilprojekt-grosse-spei

    The Energy Campus Nuremberg deals with energy technology of the future. The partners work on all relevant topics to make energy supply more flexible and sustainable. In the part addressing the long-time storage of energy the Chair of Energy Processing works on a new, innovative concept for methanation.

    This new concept is optimized for dynamic operation in power-to-gas applications and is experimentally demonstrated.

  • In-situ Characterization of Nanomaterials with Electrons, X-rays/Neutrons and Scanning Probes

    (Third Party Funds Group – Overall project)

    Term: 1. October 2013 - 30. September 2022
    Funding source: DFG / Graduiertenkolleg (GRK)

    Research into innovative nanostructured materials is of fundamental importance for Germany’s technological competitiveness and in addressing global challenges, like the development of renewable energy sources. Nanostructured materials are controlled by size and interfaces, which give rise to enhanced mechanical properties and new physical effects leading in turn to new functionalities. The design of novel nanostructured materials and devices such as flexible electronics demands state-of-the-art nanocharacterisation tools. In particular, methods based on short-wave radiation (electrons, X-rays/neutrons) or scanning probes are ideally suited to analyse materials at the nanometer and atomic scale. Recently developed in situ capabilities and the use of complementary characterisation methods allow unique insights into the structure formation, functionality and deformation behaviour of complex nanostructures. These new in situ techniques will be the future key tools for the development of new materials and devices. The doctoral programme combines, for the first time, these three pillars of nanocharacterisation into a structured Research Training Group. The main objective of this programme is to provide the next generation of scientists and engineers with comprehensive, method-spanning and interdisciplinary training in the application of cutting-edge nanocharacterisation tools to materials and device development. Within the programme, the in situ methods will be further developed and used to address fundamental questions regarding the growth, stability and functionality of complex nanostructures and interfaces. Project area A "Functional Nanostructures and Networks" will address the properties of individual nano-objects and how these translate into functionality when assembled to nano-networks. In Project area B "Mechanical Properties of Interfaces" various kinds of interfaces with different bonding characteristics and morphologies will be studied in well-defined loading scenarios. This parallel, complementary study of both functional and mechanical materials properties over several length scales by multiple in situ methods is unprecedented. Our PhD candidates will be well-positioned in a network of international collaborations and highly trained in multiple, complementary techniques, providing them with an essential foundation for a successful career in the field of advanced materials and devices development.

  • Hybride semiconductors – metal nanowire composites for opto-electronic devices

    (Third Party Funds Group – Sub project)

    Overall project: In situ Microscopy with Electrons, X-rays and Scanning Probes
    Term: 1. October 2013 - 30. September 2022
    Funding source: DFG / Graduiertenkolleg (GRK)

    Project A6 combines the findings from the first funding period, which investigated the transport properties of metallic nanowires as well as inorganic nanoparticles as a function of microstructure and microstructure with c-AFM and electron microscopy methods. The follow-up project will address the electrical and optical properties of nanoparticle-filled nanowire composites. The focus of the investigations is on the microscopic understanding of the charge carrier transport between the semiconducting matrix and the metallically conductive nanowires. In situ X-ray spectroscopy under light (c-AFM and STM) should provide insight into the electrical processes at the interfaces.

  • Growth and characterization of thin single crystalline layers for molecular electronics

    (Third Party Funds Group – Sub project)

    Overall project: In situ Microscopy with Electrons, X-rays and Scanning Probes
    Term: 1. October 2013 - 30. September 2022
    Funding source: DFG / Graduiertenkolleg (GRK)
    URL: https://www.grk1896.forschung.fau.de/teaching/project-areas/project-area-a/a4-geometric-and-electronic-structure-of-metal-organi

    Metal-organic charge-transfer complexes based on TCNQ shows exciting electrical or photochemical switching properties, which involves modification of the valence state of TCNQ (TCNQ-/TCNQ°). We use complementary microspectroscopic tools to investigate in-situ the switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanocrystals. Structural probes like Nano-XRD and electron diffraction are considered to offer insight into potential structural modifications upon electrical switching.

2021

2020

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